Prairie Gatsbys

Polo Clubs, Hunting Clubs, Billiard rooms, rounds of entertaining,__these were part and parcel of the mansion set at the beginning of the 1900's on the prairies. Winnipeg enjoyed the largest number partly because it was the bigger city centre

and partly because it had the largest proportion of self employed merchants, grain brokers, stockbrokers, and real estate

men in its population.

Though titles for Canadians would soon be forbidden, it was a huge status symbol of the mansion set and also respected by the general public, most of whom hailed from Europe where such a thing ensured an elevated status and preferred social 

treatment.

Sir James Lougheed a senator and Knight got twice as much space in the Calgary newspapers as William Roper Hull, his neighbour and fellow tycoon.

During the 1960's the farmers were said to have lived poor and died rich. Most of their lives having lived without the comforts of urban dwellers. These same comforts were enjoyed late in life by farmers due to the steady increase in the value of farmland 

as a result of inflation.

It could have been said most of the mansion dwellers of the 1920's lived rich and died poor.Also as a direct result of inflation.

The Ashdowns, Alloways, Allans, Robinsons, Lougheeds, Hulls, Burnses, Magraths, Munsons, Endertons, Gardiners, Rileys, Ryans, McMeans, etc built the kind of mansion they could afford out of the capital surplus they had built up.

As their store of wealth grew they moved into larger and grander homes.

Truman Frederick Calder was the latter part of this wave of entrepreneurs. Later owners of the Calder House would be 

mortgaged.

Many of the late comers to the feast,__in the 1920's ,__were too eager to live likewise and borrowed on their incomes and indulged in their taste for higher living. When the crash of 1928 came they went down like tenpins til few or none remained.

As the first pre world war I millionaires died out, the 1920's failed to replace them. Without a steady production of millionaires, mansion building, even on a modest scale was phased out. Thus the" Age of Elegance", was over on the prairies. 

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848 Saskatchewan Crescent East

Saskatoon SK  Canada  S7N 0L4

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